Google Maps: Drifting Through Post-Humanism and Away From Psychogeography? | Prerna Anilkumar

Prerna Anilkumar If you are reading this on a screen you are already a cyborg. You are already a Post-human. (Take a minute and absorb that in.) . . . . . Who is a Post-human? Any possible being whose basic capacities radically exceed those of average humans.  This in turn unambiguously distances that being from the category of a ‘human’. There have been multiple … Continue reading Google Maps: Drifting Through Post-Humanism and Away From Psychogeography? | Prerna Anilkumar

Learning to Listen | Michael Walzer

The Sunday Reading List for this week comes from the Editor Emeritus of Dissent Magazine, Michael Walzer. His recent article ‘Learning to Listen’ calls for leftists in America to listen to their comrades abroad in an effort to make ‘internationalism’ work. It is a proposal for change in the approach of the Big Powers’ (of the West) foreign policy. Continue reading Learning to Listen | Michael Walzer

Why Nietzsche is not Responsible for Trump | Emmanuel Alloa

However, maybe a more precise description, rather than post-truth, would be that of ‘alternative truth’. Since the point is not so much to get rid of the claim of truth altogether, but rather to reshape the possibilities of accounting for it and give it the place it deserves. Continue reading Why Nietzsche is not Responsible for Trump | Emmanuel Alloa

Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from the desk of Jeffrey J. Williams who is a Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. Apart from being a teacher of English literature and modern criticism and theory, Williams is also known to be a writer about American University culture. One of the most important writings in that regard have been his article ‘Pedagogy of Debt’ which is a study into the shift of the nature of university education in the United Statesand the implications of the ever rising amounts of student debt. Continue reading Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

The Dichotomies of Social Media | Mitakshara Medhi

For most parts, human life tends to exist in the grey areas. This is because the extremities of what constitutes “happy” and what constitutes “sad” can seldom be met by any person. Even if it does occur in someone’s life, it is never ever-lasting. Hence, the grey area is where the human mind usually operates – the very area that is never and can never be represented on the virtual world. Continue reading The Dichotomies of Social Media | Mitakshara Medhi