Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from the desk of Jeffrey J. Williams who is a Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. Apart from being a teacher of English literature and modern criticism and theory, Williams is also known to be a writer about American University culture. One of the most important writings in that regard have been his article ‘Pedagogy of Debt’ which is a study into the shift of the nature of university education in the United Statesand the implications of the ever rising amounts of student debt. Continue reading Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

Trajectory of Endurance: The Cinema of Steve McQueen|Dipankar Sarkar

In a span of six years, British filmmaker Steve McQueen has made three films whose cinematic grammar equates with a style that primarily concerns with his propensity to construct a dramatic structure in a contrarian fashion. The films that he made had dealt with themes that have explored- The physical extremity and political extremism of a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army as prisoners … Continue reading Trajectory of Endurance: The Cinema of Steve McQueen|Dipankar Sarkar

Walking | Henry David Thoreau

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from pioneering Transcendentalist and proponent of Civil Disobedience Henry David Thoreau. It comes in the shape of his 1962 essay titled ‘Walking’ (sometimes referred to as ‘The Wild’). The essay was molded in during the course of various lectures given by Thoreau – the first being in 1951 at Concord Lyceum. Continue reading Walking | Henry David Thoreau

The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from American philosopher, jurist and U.S. Constitutional law expert Ronald Dworkin. Not one to shy away from commenting on the legal and political developments around himself, Dworkin was a frequently dishing out pieces from his writing desk for The New York Review of Books. Continue reading The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore

While Rabindranath Tagore may be well known as literary personality – encompassing the fields as a poet, novelist, and playwright – it remains largely an academic adventure to delve deeper into his writings to dig out the philosopher that he was. Engaging and tackling with the issue of Nationalism, Tagore had already clarified his discomfort with the concept espoused by the nationalists of then in works such as Gora (1910), Char Adhyay and Ghare Baire (1916). But the main text of criticism of the nationalist position was titled ‘Nationalism’ and published first in 1917. Continue reading Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore

History of Marginalia | Prerna Anilkumar

Despite all its beauty, in this age of the E-book, the future of marginalia stands uncertain. In a significant move, Kindle started allowing for electronic marginalia in the form of ‘notes’. The reception of this move still being debated in various circles, one can’t deny that something of the spontaneity is lost. It seems more forced. This Coleridgean fantasy is actually not a fantasy at all. Continue reading History of Marginalia | Prerna Anilkumar

A Prisoner Of Birth-The Trial and Conviction of the Last Fuhrer

The Trial of Admiral Donitz was, according to The Times, the “Keenest legal battle of the Nuremberg Trials”. The Allies were eager to make an example of Donitz for not only heading the Reich in its last days but also for doggedly pursuing a naval war that cost the allies roughly 3,500 Merchant ships, 175 warships and 72,000 merchant and naval men. This “Battle of the Atlantic” was won at a heavy cost and Admiral Donitz was the man responsible for the pain inflicted. Continue reading A Prisoner Of Birth-The Trial and Conviction of the Last Fuhrer

History of Blue | Prerna Anilkumar

According to one theory, sky was considered to be white till we actually came up with a word for blue. The conception of this shade as a colour in our minds took its own sweet time. This thesis was further supported by a study on an old Namibian tribe which didn’t have distinct words for blue and green. Thus, language truly shaped our perception of the world.
It literally coloured our world. Continue reading History of Blue | Prerna Anilkumar