Walking | Henry David Thoreau

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from pioneering Transcendentalist and proponent of Civil Disobedience Henry David Thoreau. It comes in the shape of his 1962 essay titled ‘Walking’ (sometimes referred to as ‘The Wild’). The essay was molded in during the course of various lectures given by Thoreau – the first being in 1951 at Concord Lyceum. Continue reading Walking | Henry David Thoreau

The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from American philosopher, jurist and U.S. Constitutional law expert Ronald Dworkin. Not one to shy away from commenting on the legal and political developments around himself, Dworkin was a frequently dishing out pieces from his writing desk for The New York Review of Books. Continue reading The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore

While Rabindranath Tagore may be well known as literary personality – encompassing the fields as a poet, novelist, and playwright – it remains largely an academic adventure to delve deeper into his writings to dig out the philosopher that he was. Engaging and tackling with the issue of Nationalism, Tagore had already clarified his discomfort with the concept espoused by the nationalists of then in works such as Gora (1910), Char Adhyay and Ghare Baire (1916). But the main text of criticism of the nationalist position was titled ‘Nationalism’ and published first in 1917. Continue reading Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore

History of Marginalia | Prerna Anilkumar

Despite all its beauty, in this age of the E-book, the future of marginalia stands uncertain. In a significant move, Kindle started allowing for electronic marginalia in the form of ‘notes’. The reception of this move still being debated in various circles, one can’t deny that something of the spontaneity is lost. It seems more forced. This Coleridgean fantasy is actually not a fantasy at all. Continue reading History of Marginalia | Prerna Anilkumar

A Prisoner Of Birth-The Trial and Conviction of the Last Fuhrer

The Trial of Admiral Donitz was, according to The Times, the “Keenest legal battle of the Nuremberg Trials”. The Allies were eager to make an example of Donitz for not only heading the Reich in its last days but also for doggedly pursuing a naval war that cost the allies roughly 3,500 Merchant ships, 175 warships and 72,000 merchant and naval men. This “Battle of the Atlantic” was won at a heavy cost and Admiral Donitz was the man responsible for the pain inflicted. Continue reading A Prisoner Of Birth-The Trial and Conviction of the Last Fuhrer

History of Blue | Prerna Anilkumar

According to one theory, sky was considered to be white till we actually came up with a word for blue. The conception of this shade as a colour in our minds took its own sweet time. This thesis was further supported by a study on an old Namibian tribe which didn’t have distinct words for blue and green. Thus, language truly shaped our perception of the world.
It literally coloured our world. Continue reading History of Blue | Prerna Anilkumar

Why we owe DNS a big time | Vishal Raj Dutta

Take a moment, and imagine life without a contacts list .Imagine having to remember the phone numbers of all those you call up. All 10 digits. Goosebumps of the wrong kind, right? I mean Mom, Dad, and maybe even a significant other is doable, but in a world where laziness is the defining motto, it’d make life torturous.

The working of the Internet is somewhat in parallel lines. Continue reading Why we owe DNS a big time | Vishal Raj Dutta

On Non-Absoluteness, Hypocrisy and The Ideal

The society has forever been, is, and forever will be impregnated with exceptions. There is no absoluteness, with the one exception being that of human will, thus, proving the inherent non-absoluteness of the principle itself. Civilisation has never been absolute in its mores, folkways, governance and logic. There have always been some exceptions to every societal norm, crime being the negative exception. Continue reading On Non-Absoluteness, Hypocrisy and The Ideal