Trajectory of Endurance: The Cinema of Steve McQueen|Dipankar Sarkar

In a span of six years, British filmmaker Steve McQueen has made three films whose cinematic grammar equates with a style that primarily concerns with his propensity to construct a dramatic structure in a contrarian fashion. The films that he made had dealt with themes that have explored- The physical extremity and political extremism of a member of the Provisional Irish Republican Army as prisoners … Continue reading Trajectory of Endurance: The Cinema of Steve McQueen|Dipankar Sarkar

The Portrayal Of Women in Mikio Naruse’s films | Tasnim Nazifa & Arghya Dey

When it comes to Japanese filmmakers, very few people are aware of Mikio Naruse and his incredible contribution to the portrayal of women in film history, even though his works are no less artistically striking than the films of Yasujiro Ozu or Akira Kurosawa or Mizoguchi. Continue reading The Portrayal Of Women in Mikio Naruse’s films | Tasnim Nazifa & Arghya Dey

Review: Hannah & Her Sisters | Gaurav Haloi

Hannah and Her Sisters is one of Woody’s warmer films, composed like an episodic novel, with one-sentence inter-titles signifying the beginning of an episode in the lives of its characters. The inter-titles go from funny to morbid, from literal to metaphoric, from profound to frivolous, and in between, two years and three thanksgiving dinners in the lives of Hannah, her sisters Lee and Holly, her current husband Elliot, and her ex-husband Mickey are covered. Continue reading Review: Hannah & Her Sisters | Gaurav Haloi

POST-WAR JAPAN: The films of Shindo, Kurosawa and Honda| Arghya Dey & Tasnim Nazifa

These three films are representative of the trauma faced by the Japanese populace and document the contemporary socio-political scenario that had plagued Japan during the post war years. These films also give us an idea about the damage that the atomic bombs had left in their wake – both physical and psychological. Continue reading POST-WAR JAPAN: The films of Shindo, Kurosawa and Honda| Arghya Dey & Tasnim Nazifa

Mon Jai: A Retrospective| Sandipan Goswami

One of the major achievements of the film is that it portrayed the Assamese youth, in all its ragged glory, faithfully for the first time. The film’s refusal to shy away from taboos, which is evident in its frank portrayal of sex and use of suggestive and expletive language, makes its realism refreshingly welcome. Continue reading Mon Jai: A Retrospective| Sandipan Goswami