The Portrayal Of Women in Mikio Naruse’s films | Tasnim Nazifa & Arghya Dey

When it comes to Japanese filmmakers, very few people are aware of Mikio Naruse and his incredible contribution to the portrayal of women in film history, even though his works are no less artistically striking than the films of Yasujiro Ozu or Akira Kurosawa or Mizoguchi. Continue reading The Portrayal Of Women in Mikio Naruse’s films | Tasnim Nazifa & Arghya Dey

Review: Hannah & Her Sisters | Gaurav Haloi

Hannah and Her Sisters is one of Woody’s warmer films, composed like an episodic novel, with one-sentence inter-titles signifying the beginning of an episode in the lives of its characters. The inter-titles go from funny to morbid, from literal to metaphoric, from profound to frivolous, and in between, two years and three thanksgiving dinners in the lives of Hannah, her sisters Lee and Holly, her current husband Elliot, and her ex-husband Mickey are covered. Continue reading Review: Hannah & Her Sisters | Gaurav Haloi

POST-WAR JAPAN: The films of Shindo, Kurosawa and Honda| Arghya Dey & Tasnim Nazifa

These three films are representative of the trauma faced by the Japanese populace and document the contemporary socio-political scenario that had plagued Japan during the post war years. These films also give us an idea about the damage that the atomic bombs had left in their wake – both physical and psychological. Continue reading POST-WAR JAPAN: The films of Shindo, Kurosawa and Honda| Arghya Dey & Tasnim Nazifa

Mon Jai: A Retrospective| Sandipan Goswami

One of the major achievements of the film is that it portrayed the Assamese youth, in all its ragged glory, faithfully for the first time. The film’s refusal to shy away from taboos, which is evident in its frank portrayal of sex and use of suggestive and expletive language, makes its realism refreshingly welcome. Continue reading Mon Jai: A Retrospective| Sandipan Goswami

Wubba Lubba Dub Dub!| Arun Philip

The episode starts with a giant talking head’s appearance, causing changes to the Earth’s gravity, and thereby causing immediate climate change etc. It has only one thing to say, “Show me what you got.” Rick immediately recognizes it to be a Cromulon, and what it wants: an original hit song. Rick and Morty go to the Pentagon and inform the US president what they know. Unfortunately, all the famous musicians are dead, and it is up to Rick and Morty to make the next “it” song. Continue reading Wubba Lubba Dub Dub!| Arun Philip

Why Cinema: Fan-a-vision|Akshara Bharadwaj

Through the insecure, invidious Jake Lamotta in Raging Bull or through the corrupt, greedy Jordan Belford in The Wolf of Wall street; I have learnt to study and understand human beings through empathy. Cinema has not just made me its own student, but also a student of the world and its people. Good cinema is equivalent to good literature, for it may or may not improve your vocabulary, but it will surely impress upon and instil the same result, or, maybe, a better one. Continue reading Why Cinema: Fan-a-vision|Akshara Bharadwaj

On memory and metaphors in Remembering Kurdi|Gaurav Haloi

Remembering Kurdi documents the time around this annual pilgrimage. Sahi films conversations about life in Kurdi, feelings on leaving their homes, rituals – religious and communal – that were followed then and are followed now, and the stories of caste and feudal injustice being told. The people remember everything as if all of it happened yesterday. They harbour no ill will towards the government or the river and there’s a certain warmth about these people when they talk about Kurdi. Through their words, emotions, and actions, the film attempts to recreate a place and time that doesn’t exist in reality. Continue reading On memory and metaphors in Remembering Kurdi|Gaurav Haloi

Jan Švankmajer’s ‘The Death of Stalinism in Bohemia’ and the art of Surrealist Satire|Shantanu Singh

The film begins with the noise of falling buildings and bullets being fired. The following scene features the rush of events from 1945 to the Communist takeover in 1948. The moment of the takeover is represented by a surgical incision of Stalin’s head (which is basically a bust) under surgical lights. From the bust, the surgeon delivers the bust of Klement Gottwald. Gottwald was ordered by Stalin to set up a Communist regime that would assist the Communists to come to power in Eastern Europe. The surgeon then slaps Gottwald’s baby-bust on the back which makes it cry. The baby-bust then proceeds to deliver a speech in the voice of Stalin. Continue reading Jan Švankmajer’s ‘The Death of Stalinism in Bohemia’ and the art of Surrealist Satire|Shantanu Singh