Film of the Week | 20th Century Women

Memories of people, places, art, culture, fashion, politics and social movements collide to form an encyclopedic backdrop of a late 1970s California where the film is set in. He lends these memories to his principal characters, a 55-year-old single mother (Dorothea) and her 14-year-old son (Jamie), and in doing so, infuses the film with an undercurrent of poignancy and nostalgia. Continue reading Film of the Week | 20th Century Women

Film of the Week| Slacker

Slacker, which has gone on to earn itself a repute of being the definitive Generation X movie, is quite worthy of its reputation : in its self-indulging monologues which are rooted in the rejection of the mainstream and its lack of a narrative structure which itself is a meta-commentary on the possibilities of storytelling, the film is an anthem of the layabout twenty-somethings who spend their days drifting in space-time rambling about almost anything that they can get their mind to ponder upon. Continue reading Film of the Week| Slacker

Film of the Week| The Conversation

The film opens with a bird-eye view of the Union Square in San Francisco with people moving around like mini-figurines on a tableaux. You immediately sense the incongruity between the image and the sound; the image is an assortment of people — individuals, couples, families, street-performers — but the sound is glitchy, sensitive, motile and pointedly one-dimensional – a man and a woman are conversing and they are being recorded. Continue reading Film of the Week| The Conversation