How To Hide It: Inside The Secret World of Wealth Managers | Brooke Harrington

The Danish sociologist, Brooke Harrington, who trained for two years as an asset manager and immersed herself in this world, rightly warns of a ‘neo-feudal concentration of wealth’. A small group of rich people, she says, are not only hiding their money and avoiding taxes, they are also evading the law. Continue reading How To Hide It: Inside The Secret World of Wealth Managers | Brooke Harrington

Learning to Listen | Michael Walzer

The Sunday Reading List for this week comes from the Editor Emeritus of Dissent Magazine, Michael Walzer. His recent article ‘Learning to Listen’ calls for leftists in America to listen to their comrades abroad in an effort to make ‘internationalism’ work. It is a proposal for change in the approach of the Big Powers’ (of the West) foreign policy. Continue reading Learning to Listen | Michael Walzer

Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from the desk of Jeffrey J. Williams who is a Professor of English at Carnegie Mellon University. Apart from being a teacher of English literature and modern criticism and theory, Williams is also known to be a writer about American University culture. One of the most important writings in that regard have been his article ‘Pedagogy of Debt’ which is a study into the shift of the nature of university education in the United Statesand the implications of the ever rising amounts of student debt. Continue reading Pedagogy of Debt | Jeffrey Williams

Walking | Henry David Thoreau

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from pioneering Transcendentalist and proponent of Civil Disobedience Henry David Thoreau. It comes in the shape of his 1962 essay titled ‘Walking’ (sometimes referred to as ‘The Wild’). The essay was molded in during the course of various lectures given by Thoreau – the first being in 1951 at Concord Lyceum. Continue reading Walking | Henry David Thoreau

The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

This week’s addition to the Sunday Reading list comes from American philosopher, jurist and U.S. Constitutional law expert Ronald Dworkin. Not one to shy away from commenting on the legal and political developments around himself, Dworkin was a frequently dishing out pieces from his writing desk for The New York Review of Books. Continue reading The Right to Ridicule|Ronald Dworkin

Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore

While Rabindranath Tagore may be well known as literary personality – encompassing the fields as a poet, novelist, and playwright – it remains largely an academic adventure to delve deeper into his writings to dig out the philosopher that he was. Engaging and tackling with the issue of Nationalism, Tagore had already clarified his discomfort with the concept espoused by the nationalists of then in works such as Gora (1910), Char Adhyay and Ghare Baire (1916). But the main text of criticism of the nationalist position was titled ‘Nationalism’ and published first in 1917. Continue reading Nationalism|Rabindranath Tagore